Doctor Who? The Second Doctor

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At the end of the second serial of the Fourth Series William Hartnell bowed out of the titular role submitting the mantle of the Doctor to Patrick Troughton.

The Second Doctor

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The Second Doctor

The second Doctor was a different beast all together, where the First Doctor was quietly confident with a rigid and dignified bearing, the Second Doctor was a flapping, over excited little man who was almost a sort of cosmic hobo in appearance, sporting un-ironed shirts, a tailcoat that was 3 sizes too big, a tie that was always askew, trousers fastened with safety pins and a fur coat that was held together with a piece of string.   And whilst the First Doctor was more at home with the quiet of a good book, the Second would endlessly annoy his companions with unintelligible renditions on his trusty recorder.

After regenerating before the eyes of his companions Ben and Polly (A sailor and secretary from swinging 60’s London) the Doctor and his friends find themselves involved in an adventure pitted against the Daleks while Ben and Polly and sceptical of this new man claiming to be the Doctor. After defeating the Daleks and regaining the trust of Ben and Polly, the trio where travel to Scotland following the Battle of Culloden (1746), where they are Joined in their travels by Jaime McCrimmon an 18th Century clan piper. They go on to Cybermen on the moon, The Macra, The Daleks again and are introduced to the Yeti and The Ice Warriors of Mars, as well as the man who will become the Doctors closest and most long lasting friend Brigadier Alistair Gordon Lethbridge Stewart, the founder of U.N.I.T.

After the departure of Ben and Polly and the introduction of astrophysicist Zoe Heriot in the serial wheel in space the Doctor, Jaime, and Zoe went on to fight the Kroton’s, the Cybermen and Ice Warriors once more and even the Master of The Land of Fiction, The company meet a foe that even the Doctor cannot best, A renegade Time Lord know as the War Chief, who is abducting human armies from various points in time, and making them fight in order to gain the ultimate army to conquer any point in time and space. The Doctor (a fugitive himself) contacts the Time Lords surrendering himself to return the captive humans to their rightful homes.

The Time Lords who are sworn never to interfere in the affairs of other races place the Doctor on trial, he defends himself saying that he has only interfered for good and to save innocents. Agreeing with this the Time Lords see that earth is most vulnerable to attack from outside influences, so as punishment for the Doctor’s crimes he is exiled to earth, with his knowledge of time travel erased from his mind, and a new regeneration forced upon him, the Doctor agrees and his companions are sent back to their rightful places in time and space and the Doctor begins his exile.

Troughton stared in 118 episodes (21 serials) from 1966-1969 with three subsequent appearances during his lifetime, Troughton possibly had the hardest time of any Doctor, how do you replace the original (look at new coke) but Troughton managed to bring his own uniqueness to the role, he didn’t try to simply play a younger version of William Hartnell, but was his own man, and the show was the better for it, this is why it is such a shame that much of the Second Doctor’s run was junked by the BBC and now only exists in dribs and drabs with only 6 out the 21 serials existing intact, and whilst audio recordings and animated reconstructions exist, something is of Troughton’s original performance and chemistry is lost.

Stand Out Serials 

  1. The Enemy Of The World: A sick and twisted dictator who rules the world, but is seen by many as noble saviour, who also happens to look like The Doctor? What could be better, the Doctor and friends work with rebels to take expose the corruption of the evil Salamander, the only bad part of the serial is Troughton’s teensy bit racist mexican accent.
  2. The Web Of Fear: This serial introduces us to the Brigadier, a stalwart of the whole series, it also marks the second appearance of the Great Intelligence and the Yetis, this time in the London underground,.
  3. The War Games: Whilst I feel that this serial could have been shorter (whilst not the longest, a 10 part serial is still a lot to take) it sheds the most light on the Doctor, mentioning for the first time his race and introducing yet another meddlesome Time Lord, in the War Chief, who I feel was a precursor to the more villainous and long lived Master. It also marks Patrick Troughton’s last regular appearance as the Doctor before being replaced by Jon Pertwee

Dishonourable Mention 

  1. The Questionable Relationship Between The Doctor And Jaime: It really is the first time that the Doctor seems to actually love one of his companions, he has definitely cared for companions in the past, even though he did leave his own granddaughter in a nightmarish dystopia with only one shoe, but with Jaime it seemed something more, from eccentric hand holding to tender embraces, the Doctor’s relationship with Jaime may be innocent and it may be my sick mind reading something that isn’t there, but you tell me.

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Join again soon for more on the wonderful worlds of The BBC’s Doctor Who.

This is the Second in a series of posts relating to the BBC’s long running show Doctor Who.

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