Carers Allowance and Social Mobility

Did you know that there are over 370,000 carers in Wales. That’s more than double the population of Newport City. So that’s over 10% of the population of Wales caring for a someone who is either sick or disabled. And many of these people will be claiming carers allowance (or the carers allowance part of universal credit), because owing to their care duties, they are unable to work. The basic rate of carers allowance is £64.40 per week (£3348.80 per year) and if for whatever reason this is the only benefit you are entitled to, you can guess it doesn’t go very far. I also don’t understand why its so low, for example you could have the exact same personal circumstance, but if you were claiming job seekers allowance, you would be receiving £73.10 per week, which doesn’t make sense to me.

But lets talk about transport and other costs that are associated with caring for someone sick or disabled. Trips to doctors and hospital appointments big parts of caring someone, especially someone who is sick, and the long term sick and disabled will be able to use buses for free (in Wales at least) however their carers wont. To travel from Cwmbran (where I live) to the nearest major hospital (the Royal Gwent in Newport) will cost approximately £9.50 in bus fare which is over 15% of your weekly income in many cases for carers.

Moving forward I would make it a priority for the Welsh Government to introduce concessionary bus passes for all those in receipt of carers allowance. The Welsh Government is already willing to pay for 736,000 concessionary bus passes for the over 60’s regardless of income or status, as well as paying for all those who suffer from long term illness or disability. So why not make the move towards some sort of social mobility for what is often a forgotten strand of society?

The Lazy Ramblings Of A Lazy Guy (On Being In Love)

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I was recently introduced to the Idle Thoughts Of An Idle Fellow by Jerome K Jerome. The book consists of 14 essays on 14 topics

  1. ON BEING IDLE.
  2. ON BEING IN LOVE.
  3. ON BEING IN THE BLUES.
  4. ON BEING HARD UP.
  5. ON VANITY AND VANITIES.
  6. ON GETTING ON IN THE WORLD.
  7. ON THE WEATHER.
  8. ON CATS AND DOGS.
  9. ON BEING SHY.
  10. ON BABIES.
  11. ON EATING AND DRINKING.
  12. ON FURNISHED APARTMENTS.
  13. ON DRESS AND DEPORTMENT.
  14. ON MEMORY.

Jerome K Jerome is pretty much me down to a tee. He’s lazy and just writes whatever comes to mind. He doesn’t care who he offends, and I often felt that he may have been somewhat high when he picked up the pen. But Mr Jerome has inspired me, so I am going to be writing a series of posts on the topics that Mr Jerome turned his hand at. (I know I’m ripping the guy off, but quite frankly I don’t care)

On Being In Love 

Have you ever seen someone and known that they would be a terrible distraction to your life. That was how I would describe it, that feeling of knowing that this person is going to really change your life. That knowledge that this is going to be massively inconvenient.

That’s how it all begins then you slip into it, the early days are all wine and dinner and flowers and dancing, but then comes the big pants and netflix, the cups of tea, the farting and the lack of make up, if you can get through that, that is true love. The enduring real world version of the thing.

Foreigner wanted to know what love is, well its two people who have decided to just give up and settle with each other because they find the other person somewhat less detestable than the rest of humanity, that my friends is love.

This is the second in series of posts ripping off the work of Mr Jerome K Jerome and his seminal piece The Idle Thoughts Of An Idle Man.

 

Public House

So, one of the key stones of the Conservative Party’s vision for Britain (whatever you may think of that) is the right for council house tenants and tenants of social housing to buy the house they live in. On the face of it this is a good policy giving the poorer members of society a chance to own there own home and climb up that first rung of the property ladder.

What the policy doesn’t address however is the chronic lack of social housing in the UK. In parts of the Great Britain, for a one bedroom flat, there is a 16 year waiting list.

So basically what this policy is doing is shrinking the already over stretched number of social houses in Britain. But this policy does not make adequate provisions for the building of new social housing. Therefore what Britain will soon be facing is a social housing crisis. With more and more people taking more and more houses into private ownership those waiting lists will be getting longer and longer. Now the government is not doing nothing. In order to free up social housing with less fuss the government is doing away with long term assured tenancies. Thus leaving the most vulnerable with no assurance of a place to live.